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Center for Academic Ethics

Past Events 2017 Spring

SPRING 2017 EVENTS

All UNI faculty, staff, and students are invited to attend all events.  Selected events are intended for the community as well. 

Some events qualify toward achieving the Ethics in Scholarship certification for graduate students, as noted. 

Some events require advance registration.

Download the Spring events list as a pdf file for printing or posting. 

 

Getting to the Heart of Integrity: Nurturing Vulnerability and Courage

Public Lecture by Abbylynn Helgevold, Ph.D., Instructor, Philosophy & World Religions

Monday, January 30, 2017, 4:00-5:00 pm, Rod Library 301

Although integrity is widely-recognized as essential for scholarly work and activity, public discussion regarding what it means to have and to nurture integrity is quite rare. The aim of this talk is to generate such a discussion through a reflection on the meaning of integrity and on the role that courage and vulnerability play in its cultivation. 

Registration is NOT required for this event.  Open to the general public.  Fits Part B for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the Center for Academic Ethics.  For further information, email Emma Welch at welche@uni.edu. 

 

Avoiding Plagiarism

RCR Workshop by Ellen Neuhaus, Associate Professor, Rod Library and Deanne Gute, Writing Coordinator, Academic Learning Center

This workshop will be offered twice:

Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 3:00-5:00 pm, Rod Library 301
Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 3:00-5:00 pm, Rod Library 301

This training session will help participants become acquainted with key ethical issues involved in research and scholarship.  It will include presentations and interactive discussion on topics related to authorship.  It will focus primarily on how to avoid plagiarism of others' work as well as one's own, but will also touch on collaboration in authorship and publication/dissemination.  The session will help to satisfy the requirements for research ethics training for students employed on NSF and NIH projects.  This session targets graduate students, but all are welcome to attend.

Registration is required.  Fits Part A for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the Center for Academic Ethics, the Graduate College, Rod Library, & the Academic Learning Center.  For further information, email Emma Welch at welche@uni.edu.

 

The Reproducibility Crisis in Science

Darwin Week Lecture by Helen Harton, Ph.D., Professor, Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Academic Ethics

Monday, February 13, 2017, 3:00-4:00 pm, Maucker Union University Room

Registration is NOT required for this event.  Fits Part A for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by UNI Freethinkers and Inquirers.  For further information, email Casey McGregor (Freethinkers director of public relations) at mcgregoc@uni.edu.

 

Cheating at UNI: Faculty and Student Perspectives

Graduate College Brown Bag Lecture by Helen Harton, Ph.D., Professor, Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Academic Ethics

Tuesday, February 14, 2017, 12:30-1:30 pm, Rod Library 287

Dr. Harton will share the results from the student and faculty study conducted by the Center for Academic Ethics last spring, which surveyed students and faculty members on their perceptions of the UNI student academic ethics policy and the frequency of various cheating behaviors in the classroom and other scholarly activities.  

Registration is NOT required for this event.  Fits Part B for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the UNI Graduate College.  For further information, email Emma Welch at welche@uni.edu. .

 

Science 2.0:  Transparency and Openness as the Keys to Solving the Reproducibility Crisis

Alumni lecture by Katherine Corker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Psychology, Grand Valley State University

Monday, March 6, 2017, 3:00-4:00 pm, Rod Library 301

There is much talk these days about the "reproducibility crisis" in science, but what does it mean and why is everyone so concerned about it?  Reproducibility is the foundation for public trust in scientific research, and yet we are finding that many studies in diverse disciplines cannot be replicated and their findings verified by other researchers, a cornerstone of the scientific method.  Dr. Corker will provide an overview of the national and international conversation taking place on this issue, share information on the research underway to assess the problem, and offer potential approaches for addressing it. 

Registration is required.  Faculty and graduate students involved in research are particularly encouraged to attend.  Fits Part A for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the Center for Academic Ethics, Research & Sponsored Programs, and the Department of Psychology.  For further information, email Emma Welch at welche@uni.edu.

 

OSF 101:  Introduction to the Open Science Framework, including Data Archival and Pre-Registration

Hands-on Workshop by alumna Katherine Corker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Psychology, Grand Valley State University

Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 2:00-3:30 pm, Sabin 102 (computer lab)

Dr. Corker is an ambassador for the Open Science Framework (OSF), an online project sharing and collaboration initiative developed by the nonprofit Center for Open Science.  The OSF has grown out of the current national and international movement towards greater transparency and openness in research, and offers researchers the opportunity to store data, organize, and manage their research projects across teams, departments, and institutions.  It also provides incentives for them to publicly document their research process to better enable replication and encourage thorough documentation in planning and executing projects.  As an ambassador for OSF, Dr. Corker promotes the benefits of open science methods and instructs others in how to use the online OSF tools and processes.  In this hands-on workshop, Dr. Corker will introduce the OSF and demonstrate how to set up and manage your research activities in the system as well as use it for data sharing and communications across research teams.    

Registration is required.  Faculty and graduate students involved in research are particularly encouraged to attend.  Fits Part A for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the Center for Academic Ethics, Research & Sponsored Programs, and the Department of Psychology.  For further information, email Emma Welch at welche@uni.edu.

 

Ethical Considerations in Research with Children with Disabilities

Presentation by Susan Etscheidt, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Special Education; and Christopher Kliewer, Ph.D., Professor, Special Education

Monday, March 27, 2017, 3:00-5:00 pm, Schindler Education Center 409

This session is focused on achieving the ethical ideals of autonomy, beneficence, and justice in research with students with disabilities. Several propositions and proposals will be presented …to hopefully generate some interesting discussion and questions.

Proposition 1: The traditional utilitarian approach to research which involves weighing the value and benefits of research and practice against the possible costs or harm to the participants may be insufficient to achieve those ethical ideals. You will be invited to consider alternative, ethical “Spheres”.

Proposition 2: A conclusion that we have met our ethical obligations through an initial, contractual agreement to obtain parental consent and child assent prior to research may obscure the ethical complexities that we encounter as we sustain interact with students with disabilities in research. You will be invited to consider a sustained assent and parental permission as well as informed dissent through the duration of research and educational practice.

Proposition 3: The attribution of children with disabilities as a homogeneous, vulnerable, need-to-be-protected, group may inadvertently restrict the child’s active and self-determined involvement in research and special education practices. This interpretation of vulnerability may reinforce a presumption of incompetence… an artifact of the medical model which views disability as a condition that must be overcome…research and practice should correct or normalize the child. ..in contrast to the social model of disability which views disability as a difference and not a deficiency. You will be invited to explore an alternative view of vulnerability – one that requires increased and sustained efforts to enhance child involvement in research.

The session will also include two proposals to address ethical issues in research involving students with disabilities. First, that parental permission and child assent must be sustained – and revisiting child assent in research. Second, the application of “nothing about us without us” should guide research with students with disabilities.

Registration is required.  Fits Part A for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the Center for Academic Ethics.  For further information, email Emma Welch at welche@uni.edu.

 

Spring “What If” seminars, in partnership with the David W. Wilson Chair in Business Ethics

What If....  School Districts Valued Farm to School Programs as an Essential Part of Education?

What If? session led by Jodie Huegerich, RD, Local Food Program Manager, Center for Energy and Environmental Education

Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 7:00 - 8:30 pm, Cedar Falls Public Library

School districts including more local foods in menus will be discussed and the positive impacts that has on nutrition, quality of food, the local economy, and the life-long habits of children. We welcome and encourage attendance and participation from parents and families with children attending K-12 schools, school board members from any district, K-12 school staff, and anyone in the community who has an interest in good food being served to children attending K-12 schools.

Registration is NOT required.  Open to the general public.  Fits Part B for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the David W. Wilson Business Ethics Chair, the UNI College of Business, and the Center for Academic Ethics.  For further information, email craig vansandt@uni.edu.

 

What If.... Familes Came First in All Organizations?

What If? session led by Disa Cornish, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, and Susan Roberts-Dobie, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Kinesiology, Allied Health, & Human Services

Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 7:00 - 8:30 pm, Cedar Falls Public Library

What if we paid more attention to new moms and babies? What if we found ways to support parents and infants? Social support, family leave policies, and childcare will be explored in an interactive session focusing on the potential benefits to the wellbeing of our communities through health education and policy changes. We welcome and encourage attendance and participation from pregnant/parenting individuals and families, healthcare providers, social service providers, childcare providers, policymakers, and anyone in the community who has an interest in the health and wellbeing of families and children.

Registration is NOT required.  Open to the general public.  Fits Part B for Ethics in Scholarship certification.  Sponsored by the David W. Wilson Business Ethics Chair, the UNI College of Business, and the Center for Academic Ethics.  For further information, email craig vansandt@uni.edu.